Judging with Righteous Judgment Pt. 1 – Losing Friends

I lost another friend recently. He decided after reading my book “Whole Bible Christianity,” which is full of righteous judgment or application of the Law, and a couple of emails about the practical applications, that he wasn’t a happy camper.

 

“I enjoy talking with you about Scripture; it is an entertaining, learning, and intellectual exercise. But I do not agree with your conclusions or your applications. I especially do not agree with your analysis regarding the church, others, or anything outside of Scripture.”

 

He hasn’t emailed me back after I responded to this and other things at the end of February. There wasn’t a single biblical argument he made in rebuttal, either to the book or my applications, so he just decided to call me a few names and cut it off.

 

This was after, of course, he lectured me extensively on “love,” especially on its unconditional aspects where God is concerned. I’m sure you can appreciate the irony. I disagreed with his version, which consisted pretty much of sentiment only, and argued for the Bible version, consisting of doing what God says. As with any clique, the church version lasts only as long as you push whatever agenda (doctrine, tradition, whatever) that particular church pushes. This explains his departure. So much for the church version of love. That kind of love believers don’t need. I much prefer God’s version, which keeps me a part of His household no matter what mistakes I make.

 

It wasn’t like I didn’t have abundant Scriptural proof of what I was saying. There are over 800 verses written out and hundreds of references for other verses too. It was just that he didn’t like it. That’s going to happen a lot when we are dealing with Bible subjects, and especially how they are used in righteous judgment for daily living. Law is love, and love is Law. Many people do not like the Law precisely because it is objective and clear. They want to keep doing what they are doing, and believing what they are believing. This makes their love suspect. The Law just gets in the way.

 

So one of the things we need to realize as we apply the Bible with righteous judgment, as Jesus tells us, is that we are going to lose friends. But if we are not losing “friends” then there is a good possibility that we are not really applying His Words at all, let alone with righteous judgment.

 

There is a war going on which God didn’t start. But He’s the one who is going to finish it. I have not picked the battle, but I HAVE picked which side I’m on.

Left Behind is a Good Thing

In Matthew 24 and Luke 17 Jesus gives us an outline of what will take place at the “end of the age” as the apostles asked. At one point Jesus says, “Two men will be in the field, one will be taken and one left. Two women will be grinding at the mill, one will be taken and one left.” Most Christians think these are verses about the rapture. There was a nifty song in the ‘70’s that spoke of people being taken as being raptured (I Wish We’d All Been Ready by Larry Norman), translated into imperishable bodies to be with Jesus forever. The people remaining were “left behind.” It’s a good thought, but wrong. It is clear from the context that ‘taken’ means destroyed.

Jesus compares this time to the time of the flood, when people were going about their daily living as sudden destruction came. “They were unaware until the flood came and swept them all away.” If the proportion (50%) is intended to be exact, that means at least half the world’s population will be destroyed.
There are other places where ‘taken’ is obviously related to destroyed or killed.

Therefore I am full of the wrath of the LORD; I am weary of holding it in. “Pour it out upon the children in the street, and upon the gatherings of young men, also; both husband and wife shall be taken, the elderly and the very aged. (Jeremiah 6:11, ESV)

To be “taken” is not a fun thing. To be consistent with the rest of the Word, ‘taken’ in the context of what Jesus is talking about is not fun at all.

‘Whole Bible Prophecy’ manuscript by Bruce Scott Bertram

Jesus Brings a Sword, Not Peace

“Do not think that I have come to bring peace to the earth. I have not come to bring peace, but a sword. For I have come to set a man against his father, and a daughter against her mother, and a daughter-in-law against her mother-in-law. And a person’s enemies will be those of his own household. Whoever loves father or mother more than me is not worthy of me, and whoever loves son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me. And whoever does not take his cross and follow me is not worthy of me. Whoever finds his life will lose it, and whoever loses his life for my sake will find it. (Matthew 10:34–39, ESV)